Speakers

Wolfgang Hennerbichler

Wolfgang Hennerbichler

Senior Engineering Manager, GitHub

Wolfgang Hennerbichler recently switched to GitHub as a Site Reliability Enginner, where he is responsible for monitoring and observability. He worked at Google for the last 5 years as a Site Reliability Engineering Tech Lead for the company wide alerting system as well as as a manager of two Site Reliability Engineering teams.

Building Applications that SRE will love

Site Reliabilty Engineering (SRE) is a pessimistic job. While many developers write their code in an optimistic way, thinking about how things will work, SREs mostly think about what can go wrong. They try to optimize distributed systems for the worst case scenarios - traffic overload, cascading failures and how databases can go corrupt. The talk will be about how to design applications that SREs will love.

Brice Fernandes

Brice Fernandes

Engineer, Weaveworks

Brice fell in love with programming while studying physics and never really looked back since. He has a broad technology background that covers everything from embedded C to backendless browser apps using the trendiest javascript frameworks. He taught Game Development and Functional Programming online and founded his own education platform for developers before joining Weaveworks. He now spends his time helping companies make the most of Kubernetes.
DEV

Tutorial: Hands on GitOps

In this hands-on tutorial, Brice Fernandes from Weaveworks will go through setting up and using a Gitops pipeline to manage a Kubernetes cluster. This will include setting up monitoring and metric visualisation as well as managing the monitoring configuration using Gitops.

After taking this tutorial, attendees will be able to:
  • Set up their own Gitops pipeline to manage their kubernetes cluster
  • Compare the desired state of a Kubernetes cluster against the actual state
  • Deploy Prometheus and Grafana to a Kubernetes cluster
  • Set up a continuous deployment pipeline for Kubernetes workloads
Attendees should:
  • Know of kubernetes and the kubectl command line.
  • Be comfortable with Git
  • Be comfortable with the Unix command line

No preparation needed. Attendees will be provided with an online environment to use during the tutorial. Bring a laptop with a modern browser.

Florian Bacher

Florian Bacher

Technology Strategist, Dynatrace

In his role as Technology Strategist, Florian drives the strategy, adoption and integration of OpenShift at Dynatrace and is a main contributor of the open source project keptn. He is always eager to dive into new technologies, especially in the context of cloud native applications. Before starting his role at Dynatrace, Florian did his master’s degree in computer science at Klagenfurt University and worked as a Software Engineer, mainly in mobile application development. When not working, he mostly spends his time playing guitar or in the gym.
DEV

Knative

This workshop gives an overview of Knative Serving and Knative Eventing: 'Knative serving' provides primitives for serverless frameworks. It especially knows how to scale-to-zero and is already used in several FaaS frameworks. 'Knative eventing' is an eventing specification for sending CloudEvents, an emerging CNCF standard, from sources to sinks. You will follow along an end-to-end demo, leveraging advanced message brokers such as Apache Kafka, behind Knative APIs.

Lee Calcote

Lee Calcote

Founder, Layer5

Lee Calcote is an innovative product and technology leader, passionate about empowering engineers with efficient and effective solutions. As Founder of Layer5, he is at the forefront of the cloud native movement. Open source, advanced and emerging technologies have been a consistent focus through Calcote’s tenure at SolarWinds, Seagate, Cisco and Schneider Electric. An advisor, author, and speaker, Calcote is active in the community as a Docker Captain, Cloud Native Ambassador and Google Summer of Code Mentor.
OPS

Service Meshes, but at what cost?

As you learn of the architecture and value provided by service meshes, you’re intrigued and initially impressed. Upon reflection, you, like many others think: “I see the value, but what overhead does being on the mesh incur?”

Complicating the answer is the fact that there are over 10 service meshes projects to choose from. While this presentation does not take an in-depth look at the landscape of service meshes, it does introduce Meshery as a utility for both benchmarking service mesh performance and provides a playground for familiarizing with the various features of different service meshes.

Christian Schwendtner

Christian Schwendtner

Trainer & Consultant, devinitive

Christian Schwendtner is a passionate software architect and developer. He is an expert with longstanding experience in web development and Microsoft technologies. Christian is trainer, consultant and speaker at conferences, and with his experience he can offer developers valuable tips and tricks for their daily work. He studied Software Engineering at the University of Applied Sciences Hagenberg, at which he is avocational lecturer.
DEV

GraphQL – forget (the) REST? A query language for your API

Are you using RESTful web services to provide data for your apps? “Sure, what else?” Well, then you should take a closer look at GraphQL. GraphQL is a query language for your API and is used by Facebook, GitHub and others as an alternative to RESTful web services.

What is GraphQL? Which problems does it try to solve? How can we implement a GraphQL backend? A lot of questions, which we will discuss and answer in this workshop.

Together we will develop a GraphQL backend using Node.js and Apollo Server and we will have a look at the central parts like the Schema and Resolvers. We will also discuss potential (performance) problems and possible solutions.

This workshop does not require any GraphQL knowledge and targets GraphQL beginners.

Nathaniel Schutta

Nathaniel Schutta

Developer Advocate, Pivotal

Nathaniel T. Schutta is a software architect focused on cloud computing and building usable applications. A proponent of polyglot programming, Nate has written multiple books and appeared in various videos. Nate is a seasoned speaker regularly presenting at conferences worldwide, No Fluff Just Stuff symposia, meetups, universities, and user groups. In addition to his day job, Nate is an adjunct professor at the University of Minnesota where he teaches students to embrace dynamic languages. Driven to rid the world of bad presentations, Nate coauthored the book Presentation Patterns with Neal Ford and Matthew McCullough. Nate recently published Thinking Architecturally available as a free download from Pivotal.
OPS

Responsible Microservices

These days, you can’t swing a dry erase marker without hitting someone talking about microservices. Developers are studying Eric Evan’s prescient book Domain Driven Design. Teams are refactoring monolithic apps, looking for bounded contexts and defining a ubiquitous language. And while there have been countless articles, videos, and talks to help you convert to microservices, few have spent any appreciable time asking if a given application should be a microservice. In this talk, I will show you a set of factors you can apply to help you decide if something deserves to be a microservice or not. We’ll also look at what we need to do to maintain a healthy micro(services)biome.

There are many good reasons to use a microservices architecture. But there are no free lunches. The positives of microservices come with added complexity. Teams should happily take on that complexity…provided the application in question benefits from the upside of microservices. This talk will cut through the hype to help you make the right choice for your unique situation.

Responsible Microservices is based on my blog series Should that be a Microservice? Keep These Six Factors in Mind found on the Pivotal blog.

Thinking Architecturally

Rich Hickey once said programmers know the benefits of everything and the trade offs of nothing…an approach that can lead a project down a path of frustrated developers and unhappy customers. As architects though, we must consider the trade offs of every new library, language, pattern or approach and quickly make decisions often with incomplete information. How should we think about the inevitable technology choices we have to make on a project? How do we balance competing agendas? How do we keep our team happy and excited without chasing every new thing that someone finds on the inner webs?

Frank Munz

Frank Munz

Senior Technical Evangelist, AWS

Frank Munz is a Senior Technical Evangelist for Amazon Web Services based in Germany.,Before he went "all in" with the cloud, Frank has worked as a DevOps engineer and software architect in Europe and Australia. Apart from containers, his interests lie in big/fast data, and machine learning.,Frank has over 20 years of industry experience. He ran his own boutique consultancy for more than a decade and worked for and on behalf of TIBCO, BEA, and Oracle. He is a published author of the book Middleware and Cloud Computing, and holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Technische Universität München (TUM).
AI

Serverless Analytics for Streaming Data and Data Lakes

This is a beginner to medium level workshop designed to illustrate how to process real-time data streams in a serverless way. In this workshop, we’ll build infrastructure to enable operations personnel at Wild Rydes headquarters to monitor the health and status of their unicorn fleet. Each unicorn is equipped with a sensor that reports its location and vital signs. During this workshop we’ll use AWS to build applications to process and visualize this data in real-time.

During this workshop you can learn about Real-time Data Streaming, Stream Aggregation, Stream Processing and Data Lakes. We’ll use Lambda to process real-time streams, DynamoDB to persist unicorn vitals, Amazon Kinesis Data Analytics to build a serverless application to aggregate data, Amazon Kinesis Data Firehose to archive the raw data to Amazon S3, and Athena to run ad-hoc queries against the raw data.

Important:
Johannes Bräuer

Johannes Bräuer

Technology Strategist, Dynatrace

In his role as Technology Strategist, Johannes drives the strategy, adoption and integration of Cloud Foundry at Dynatrace and is main contributor of the open source project keptn. He is passionate about approaches for microservice architectures, process automation and sharing his findings with others. Before joining Dynatrace, he earned a PhD in Business Informatics by conducting research in measuring source code and software design quality. When Johannes is not in front of a computer, you can find him on mountain bike and hiking trails.
OPS

Building unbreakable automated multi-stage pipelines with keptn

This talk introduces the open source framework keptn (https://keptn.sh/). The goal of keptn is to provide full automation of multi-stage delivery pipelines with automated quality gates and blue/green deployments, as well as self-healing capabilities in case something goes wrong in production. This way, not only the delivery of apps is automated, but it further enables users to automate their operations and let developers focus completely on their code.

During the demo part of this talk, participants will learn how to enrich delivery pipelines with quality gates that use monitoring data to decide whether a new version of a service should be promoted to the next stage or if it should be rejected. Additionally, we will cover how we can leverage build, deployment and environment metadata to automatically self-heal a service in case something goes wrong in production.

Stefan Wasserbauer

Stefan Wasserbauer

Team Lead Mixed Reality Development, Dynatrace

Stefan worked on a collaborative data visualization in a mixed reality space over the last 2 years. His focus is on making data as accessible as possible for humans. During his years at Dynatrace he worked on multiple data visualizations with an eye on rich interactivity with data. He loves maps and he is always on the hunt to find ways to equip users with superpowers.
OPS

Hello Babel fish! – A mixed reality workshop for better communication

This workshop focuses on how to build multi-device augmented/virtual/mixed reality experiences in unity. A short introduction into a framework which wraps multiple device mappings is followed by a hands-on session where a multi-user session is implemented. In this virtual environment, people can talk to each other and their speech will be translated by azure services into other languages. So, every user can choose his/her preferred language in which every conversation is translated into.

Outcome/Lessons learned: Attendees get insights in how to easily setup an AR/VR application which can be deployed on Microsoft HoloLens, Oculus Quest, HTC Vive,… Furthermore, a custom service will be implemented to handle the speech to text translation by azure cognitive services for real-time translation in the virtual space.